Dating techniques based on radioactive decay

Familiar to us as the black substance in charred wood, as diamonds, and the graphite in “lead” pencils, carbon comes in several forms, or isotopes.

One rare form has atoms that are 14 times as heavy as hydrogen atoms: carbon-14, or C ratio gets smaller.

So, we have a “clock” which starts ticking the moment something dies.

Obviously, this works only for things which were once living.

Relative-dating techniques are nearly always applicable but are not precise and require calibration.

Correlation techniques are locally useful and depend on recognition of an event whose age is known, such as a volcanic eruption or a paleomagnetic reversal.

The geological time scale and an age for the Earth of 4.5 b.y.

Since 1955 the estimate for the age of the Earth has been based on the assumption that certain meteorite lead isotope ratios are equivalent to the primordial lead isotope ratios on Earth.

In 1972 this assumption was shown to be highly questionable.

Geologic studies of active tectonism are greatly aided by definition and time calibration of local stratigraphic sequences.

Because all dating techniques may be subject to considerable error, reliability should be assessed by stratigraphic consistency between results of different dating methods or of the same method.